Wednesday open thread—A good news break

Wednesday open thread—A good news break

Wordsworth wrote: "The world is too much with us." This week hasn't been any more craptastic than any other week, but I'm feeling the world's weight on me quite heavily. Between the Kavanaugh confirmation "hearings" (more like a stampede to rubber stamp his appointment) to the latest revelations from Bob Woodward's book that we have someone in the Oval Office who is non compos mentis, I feel the need to revisit our friends at Good News Network. So, a bit of edifying news for our Wednesday.

We May Soon Be Able to Melt Down Plastic Waste into Fuel for Hydrogen Cars

Discarded plastic could be used to fuel cars in the future thanks to a ground-breaking process developed by scientists from Swansea University.
 
They have been able to transform unwanted plastic into hydrogen which in turn could be used to run cars.
 
Dr. Moritz Kuehnel of the University’s chemistry department explains how light-absorbing material are added to the plastic, before it is placed in an alkaline solution and then exposed to sunlight, which creates hydrogen.
 
He said this process could be cheaper than recycling because any kind of plastic can be used and it does not need to be cleaned first.

In ‘World First’, Ultra-Cheap Printable Solar Panels Are Launched in Australia

An inexpensive new kind of solar power has just been launched in Australia and it could signal the start of a groundbreaking new market for renewable energy.
 
Professor Paul Dastoor has created organic solar panels that can be printed using conventional printers.
 
By using electronic inks that are printed onto sub-millimeter thin plastic sheets, the panels can be produced for less that $10 per square meter and installed by a few people within a single work day.

Students Develop One-Passenger Vehicle That Runs On Air

A team of Egyptian college students has designed a vehicle that is powered solely on oxygen.
 
The current prototype can transport 1-person at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour (40 kph) and make it almost 20 miles without needed a refuel, but the engineers plan on developing the vehicle further so it can push at least 62 mph (100 kph)—and travel 62 miles on a canister of oxygen.
 
In addition to running on one of the most common substances found on Earth, the go-kart-like vehicle only costs about $1,000 to build.

I specifically showcased science stories. If we hairless apes can survive our adolescence, we will be able to do amazing things.

This is your open thread.



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